Walter T Allender

Male 1807 - 1880  (73 years)


Personal Information    |    Sources    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Walter T Allender  [1
    Born 1807  Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Gender Male 
    Residence 1 Jun 1840 
    District 3, Baltimore, Maryland: age 30-40, wife 20-30, 1 male 60-70, 1 free colored male under 10, 1 free colored male 10-24 
    Residence 1850 
    District 2, Baltimore, Maryland 
    Cause: age 43, name is spelled Walter Allmale 
    Residence 1860  [3
    District 11, Baltimore, Maryland: age 50, with wife, age 40, and Fanney, age 50, and Jane, age 15 
    Residence 1870  [4
    District 11, Baltimore, Maryland 
    Cause: age 62, shown as W.T. Allender; with wife, Hanna, age 55; with 7 Blacks in household 
    Residence 1880  [5
    District 11, Baltimore, Maryland 
    Cause: age 73, occupation Doctor, widower, with Bowman family. 
    Died 1880  Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • On the 1840 Census Walter T. Allender is age 33 (census shows age 30-40), his wife is age 20-30, and living with them is a female age 60-70, perhaps his mother, 1 free colored male under 10, and 1 free colored male 10-24.
      Four deeds exist from Walter and Hannah Jane Allender in Baltimore Co about 1845-1849, one of which refers to his house. These were near the present Allender Rd.
      13:161 1830 John Craig to Joseph and Walter T A.
      13:163 1829 Joseph A to John Craig
      19:236 1836 Mary A. , Walter Tolley A, Joseph A. (Exec) to Tobias E Stansbury
      One the 1850 Census Walter Allender's name is spelled: Walter Allmale. His age is 43 and his wife, Hanah, is 36. Sandy Butler, age 60, is living with them and he is Black. This Census shows Walter is worth about $10,000 and he has 6 slaves: 5 males, ages 56, 26, 21, 19, and 2, and 1 female age 20.
      On the 1860 Census, he lives at Little Gunpowder, post office address, and he is age 50, his wife Hanna is age 40, and living with them is Fanney Hammer, age 50, who could be his sister, and her daughter, Jane Hammer, age 15. His property is worth $10,800. He has 8 slaves: 6 males, ages 40, 35, 17, 16, m, 12, and 10; 2 females ages 17 and 13:
      On the 1870 Census he is under W.T. Allender, age 62 and Hanna is age 55, he is worth $22,500. In their household are Joe Mifflin (age 30, laborer, Black, cannot red or write); James Mifflin (age 28, laborer, Black, cannot read or write); John Mifflin (age 13, mailer, Black); Mary Anderson (age 45, cook, Black), Albert Brown (age 30, laborer, Black, cannot read or write) and Charlotte Brown (age 20, domestic, Black)
      On the 1880 Census, his name is spelled Walter T. Alendar, he is 73 years old, widower, and has occupation Doctor. He is shown as not able to read or write. He lives with the Boronner family and with Jane A, age 38, who may be Jane Hammer, whose mother was Fanney Hammer, nee Allender. Jane is shown as a daughter and a servant. At 38 years of age, she is too old to be a daughter to the Boronners. The Census surveyer must have meant she was a daughter to Walter T. Allender, but more than likely she is the daughter to Fanney, and therefore a niece to Walter. Edna Lee, age 55, Black, is a servant with the household.
      The following is copied from the Internet: New York Divided:
      "More Slave Trouble.”-- A runaway slave named Jacob Ellis, but calling himself Wm. Dixon, residing at the corner of Hester street and Bowery, was arrested on Tuesday week last by police officer A.G. Ridgely, of Baltimore, at the instance of his owner Dr. Walter T. Alexander, who resides in that city, and committed to prison. This occurrence becoming known, the abolitionists interfered and caused the slave to be brought before the recorder on a writ of homine replegiendo. After a long argument, his honor adjourned the final hearing of the cse until 1 o'clock today, when it is expected a dexcision will be given. -- The Herald, April 12, 1837. Collection of the New-York Historical Society.
      This article about the capture of William Dixon on April 4 appeared in the Herald on Wednesday, April 12, 1837. The Herald called it “more slave trouble” because it came just days after the capture of a runaway slave named George Thompson, an event that had outraged the black community. A huge crowd had kept vigil at the court house to prevent the sheriff from taking Thompson into slavery. Thompson, however, had admitted being the fugitive in question – he also detailed how he and other slaves had stolen the master’s boat in order to escape. Because of these admissions, Thompson was pronounced a slave by Recorder Riker and was taken South on April 2. When Dixon was captured two days later, George Thompson was on everyone’s mind. The abolitionists mentioned in this article are the members of the New York Committee of Vigilance and the abolitionist lawyer Horace Dresser, who represented the captives in the Committee’s fugitive slave cases. Dresser’s fees were paid by the New York Manumission Society, founded by prominent whites in 1785 to help blacks secure their legal rights. Some of the Society’s members were abolitionists, but it was not an abolitionist organization. (For information on de homine replegiando, see the Unit 2 Background piece.)
      Note: The slave owner’s name was Walter T. Allender, not Alexander
      [The chronology of the case ends with this paragraph]
      There is no record that William Dixon’s case ever came before the New York Court of Errors. The records mayhave been lost, but it is also possible that the case was withdrawn, or that the two sides reached an agreement,since both had something to lose. If Dr. Allender won, William Dixon would lose his freedom. If William Dixon won, Dr. Allender would lose what he saw as his property, and perhaps more important, the writ de hominereplegiando would be strengthened in future slave cases. Pro-slavery forces may have advised Dr. Allender to drop the case rather than risk this outcome. The State of New York was increasingly opposed to slavery, an antislaveryman had been elected governor, and Chief Justice Nelson had not immediately found in Dr. Allender’sfavor, so a decision in Dixon’s favor may have looked likely. -- http://nydivided.org/PDF/Unit2_Final.pdf
    Person ID P1930983938  Maryland new
    Last Modified 29 Apr 2011 

    Father Joseph Allender,   b. 1770, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Between:1830/00/00-1840/00/00, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Relationship Natural 
    Mother Mary Bajas,   b. 1780, VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Between:1840/00/00-1850/00/00, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Relationship Natural 
    Married 29 Jan 1800  Baltimore, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Family ID F203  Group Sheet

    Family Hannah ?Allender,   b. 1810, VA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Between:1870/00/00-1880/00/00, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Jane Allender,   b. 1845, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location
     2. H G Allender,   b. 1846, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location
    Family ID F205  Group Sheet

  • Sources 
    1. [S-1939369652] 1840 United States Federal Census, Ancestry.com, (Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004).

    2. [S-1939369679] 1850 United States Federal Census, Ancestry.com, (Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005).

    3. [S-1939369670] 1860 United States Federal Census, Ancestry.com, (Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004).

    4. [S-1939369667] 1870 United States Federal Census, Ancestry.com, (Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2003).

    5. [S-1939369669] 1880 United States Federal Census, Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2005).

    6. [S-1939369655] Maryland Marriages, 1655-1850, Dodd, Jordan, Liahona Research, comp., (Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2004).